Why Evaluate Educational Effectiveness of Indigenous Stories? ‘Little J & Big Cuz’

Meet Little J and Big Cuz, Two Indigenous Australian Children Who Live With Their Nanna and Old Dog. With Their Teacher, Miss Chen, the Two Embark on a Series of Adventures Within, or Beyond, Their School Life to Learn About Their Culture and Unfamiliar Scholastic Surroundings.

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How Does Film Confront Contemporary Indigenous Issues? Ivan Sen on Youth Suicide

In honour of the impending, nail-bitingly anticipated film, ‘This Winter’, we, at ‘We Are All Visitors’, believe it disingenuous, moreover counterintuitive, not to recognise, of dual-heritage descent, Indigenous Australian auteur Ivan Sen’s intimate, grandiose ideals as an ideal, albeit abstract, creative vision to harness this, or what sounds like, a raw, poignant but transfixing tale on the familial bonds, dispossession and suicide epidemic of young Indigenous Australian Peoples.

Indigenous Cinema: “I Don’t Believe in Being Limited By Labels…”

“They’re individual people in a minority. The issues are a by-product of the story, not the source” – Daniel Browning (2002) Indigenous Australian filmmaker Ivan Sen’s conception of ‘Indigenous Cinema’ is one that is characterised through “direct experience” (Bunburry 2002) to address a cosmopolitan, albeit networked, audience. ‘Indigenous Cinema’ is that of a cumulative cultivation of Aboriginal Peoples’…

How Can Indigenous Cinema Cure the Plague of Mass Media?

Indigenous Cinema, at its core, is shaken on account of non-Indigenous-controlled, -owned and -produced mass media coverage, whose reflection on, and motivation of, public debates (Jennett 1983) forms a dense record of secondary-sourced, social discourses of  Indigenous Australian Peoples (Bullimore 1999). Reinforcing this fortifies distorted representations of Indigenous Australians, including, but not limited to: the violent criminal; the ‘exotic’ other; the…